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Developing Your Professional Identity and Network  

Last Updated: Sep 27, 2016 URL: http://libraryguides.muhlenberg.edu/identity_network Print Guide RSS Updates
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phone: 484-664-3602
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U.S. Government Data on Careers

  • Occuptional Outlook Handbook
    The OOH, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, can help you find career information on duties, education and training, pay, and outlook for hundreds of occupations. Includes links to trade association.
  • O*NET OnLine
    O*NET OnLine is an application that was created for the general public to provide broad access to the O*NET database of occupational information. O*NET OnLine offers a variety of search options and occupational data, while My Next Move is a streamlined application for students and job seekers. Both applications were developed for the U.S. Department of Labor by the National Center for O*NET Development.

    The O*NET database includes information on skills, abilities, knowledges, work activities, and interests associated with occupations. This information can be used to facilitate career exploration, vocational counseling, and a variety of human resources functions, such as developing job orders and position descriptions and aligning training with current workplace needs.

Authoritative Career Encyclopedias

Job Search Websites

  • Indeed
    "A huge aggregator of postings from across the Web, this site consolidates listings from many job boards in one place. It also compiles information from various company career pages and allows you to search locally or globally." --Robert Half
  • my.jobs (jobs.jobs)
    "As the hub of the .JOBS Network of sites, My.jobs acts as a starting point to match those looking for a new job with those who want to hire them. By utilizing keywords and locations for the URL naming structure, the network strives to create a page that is relevant to all job seekers, regardless of location, occupation or specialty."

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