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Comparative Slavery in the New World : Home

Need help with your research?

Contact:

Kelly Cannon
Humanities & Business Librarian
phone: x3602
email: kcannon@muhlenberg.edu
IM (AIM, Yahoo): refcannon

Getting to the full text

Once you have found the citation of a journal article you're interested in, click on the Check for Full Text buttons found next to the citation, or run a journal title search in Trexler Library's Encompass Search.

Reference works (good for generating topics and recommending sources)

Finding primary documents

Primary documents (painting, photographs, letters and diaries, fan sites, blogs, youtube video, and sound recordings) can be found abundantly by using any standard web search engine like Google. However, the library catalog and WorldCat (see below) can be good sources primary documents published in book form.

See also the footnotes of secondary sources, which often will point to primary documentation.

One excellent website offering access to primary documentation is Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, sponsored by Emory University and others.

Authoritative secondary commentary in books

Authoritative secondary commentary in articles

Websites more likely to be scholarly

Citing sources

For tips on citing print and electronic sources, visit Trexler Library's Citation Guides for Print and Electronic Resources.

Or visit the Online Writing Lab at Purdue.

For automated citation, try the shareware Zotero

For help with annotated bibliographies, visit Purdue's Online Writing Lab for definitions and format of an annotation.

Articles and books via interlibrary loan

Articles and books not found in Trexler Library can be ordered on interlibrary loan.